DWS Film and Media Avatar

Notes

BFI Film Academy

Another one. You get to make a short 3D film on this one. 

Notes

Barbican - creative learning - young people

Passionate about film? Have a talent for filmmaking? 16-19? Committed? 

We are looking for the next generation of filmmaking talent.

Applications to take part in the 2014/15 Barbican-BFi Film Academy are now open

Here’s another BFI Film Academy opportunity you guys could apply for. 

Notes

BFI Future Film Academy at BFI Southbank

Joe, Harry, Cameron, Lucas, Sam, Molly etc. Read this and apply. 

265 Notes

cinephiliabeyond:

The story goes like this: young filmmaker Colin Levy wrote to his hero Martin Scorsese several years ago, asking which films he should see in order to broaden his cinematic horizons. Scorsese’s assistant sent over a list of 39 foreign films that the director had personally recommended, along with the following note: “Mr. Scorsese asked that I sent this your way. This should be a jump start to your film education!” Thanks to Bleeding Cool & Andrew Erdle.
Here’s an A-Z list of the films that mattered to Scorsese.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//

cinephiliabeyond:

The story goes like this: young filmmaker Colin Levy wrote to his hero Martin Scorsese several years ago, asking which films he should see in order to broaden his cinematic horizons. Scorsese’s assistant sent over a list of 39 foreign films that the director had personally recommended, along with the following note: “Mr. Scorsese asked that I sent this your way. This should be a jump start to your film education!” Thanks to Bleeding Cool & Andrew Erdle.

Here’s an A-Z list of the films that mattered to Scorsese.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

267 Notes

futureoffilm:

Does Indie Film Have A Future? 
Ted Hope on blockbuster culture, critics, social media and the next Philip Seymour Hoffman.

futureoffilm:

Does Indie Film Have A Future?

Ted Hope on blockbuster culture, critics, social media and the next Philip Seymour Hoffman.

Notes

Competition: The Long Take Challenge

Click on the link to find out about the INTO FILM summer filmmaking competition. This is the same competition that three of our students won last year, so there’s no reason why one of you couldn’t do it again. 

Notes

BFI Future Film | Education events | BFI Southbank | BFI | British Film Institute

Look! Opportunities to make films! Do it! 

Notes

THE WES ANDERSON COLLECTION CHAPTER 2: RUSHMORE

1 Notes

THE WES ANDERSON COLLECTION CHAPTER 3: THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS from RogerEbert.com on Vimeo.

Notes

The Substance of Style by Matt Zoller Seitz - Moving Image Source

1 Notes

A Beginner's Guide to Wes Anderson Movies

We are studying Auteur theory with Wes Anderson as our prime example of a great auteur.

Notes

kamera.co.uk - interview - A Quick Chat with Jan Svankmajer and Eva Svankmajerova by Jason Wood

1 Notes

Jan Svankmajer - Alice (1988) - Legendado PT_BR

English Language version

1 Notes

For Fight Club

Because you guys don’t like to take notes.

The middle section of the presentation deals with Freud’s identity model of the Id, Ego and Superego. 

Think of specific moments where Tyler Durden represents both Jack’s Id gone wild and his overdeveloped Superego. 

2 Notes

Erik Satie/René Clair: Entr’Acte (1924) (by TheWelleszCompany)

In Still Moving: The Film and Media Collections of the Museum of Modern Art by Steven Higgins, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 2006, p. 104

A classic of avant-garde cinema, Entr’acte was made as an intermission piece for the Ballets Suédois production ofRelâche, a Dada theater work that premiered in Paris in December of 1924. The ballet’s director, Francis Picabia, gave René Clair a short scenario around which to build the film, and Erik Satie composed an original score to accompany it, but the finished work is “pure” cinema—the individual shots and the connections between them resulting in what Clair described as “visual babblings.” Key figures of the contemporary Parisian art world appear in the film in absurd comic cameos, including Man Ray, Marcel Duchamp, Jean Borlin (director of the Ballets Suédois), Georges Auric, Picabia, and Clair himself. As Picabia declared, Entr’acte ”respects nothing except the right to roar with laughter.”

Circulating Film Library Catalogue, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 1984, p. 167

Entr’acte is a veritable encyclopedia of the cinema of magic: the image plastic and kinetic, the sensibility comic, inventive, charming and absurd. Made as intermission entertainment for the Ballet Suédois, from an impromptu scenario by Francis Picabia and accompanied originally by an orchestral score by Erik Satie, the film stars a who’s who of the Dada movement of Paris at the time. The plot, a series of improbable adventures, is inconsequential except as an excuse for Clair to explore the limits of the medium: the camera is run forward and in reverse, tipped side to side and upside down; the film is single-framed, undercranked, and run at high speed; the resulting action is animated, sped up, slowed down; the visuals are superimposed and transformed through various matte frames; the viewer is caught up and assaulted by the frenetic pace of the recorded and edited image. The sum of these parts is a charming but challenging vision of Paris as a world of the imagination and the Dadaist intellectual conceit.

Likes